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covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital. this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate fuppeding for "washington week" is provided by -- -- corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here, to chart a greern path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- prudential financial. additional funding is provided by the annenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. 2012 was a remarkable year one that was shaped by other exploration of america's essent
-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other
and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still, and that's one thing that will never change. prudential. >> wherever our trades negotiation the economy comes to life. norfolk-suffolk, one line, infinite possibilities. >> additional corporate funding is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the anenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. perhaps you took a break for the holidays.
that's a big cause of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporter: already there is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was serious. he was friendly in the statement he made-- >> he's going on vacation. he's going to hawaii. >> susan: yeah, but there's an urgency here, and do you think we are going to be any closer to getting a deal done? >> the president really scaled back his ambitions for the immediate time. he said, look, guys, nancy pelosi, come back, try to do the minimum, try to do the least amount of harm. and then come up with some way to say that we'll address bigger issues in the new year. >> he proposed tonight a smaller package, a smaller deal. what will this mean for the economy? what will it mean for the deficit if this small deal, mini deal is passed? >> well, that could be a big problem becaus
. it is this issue, spending. >> this week on "inside washington," more fiscal cliff notes. susan rice takes her name off the board. >> i did not want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged, very politicized, very distracting, very destructive. >> what do you think will happen to assad? >> killed. >> michigan, the home of the united auto workers, now a right to work state. >> and they have been guarding the governor's office all day. >> the supreme court will tackle a marria -- gay marriage. >> it is about time. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> if we make it through december, everything will be all right. i would sing that for you, but i don't wish to offend merle haggard. feels like the coldest time of winter on capitol hill. >> there has not been any progress. >> the president and his allies have taken so many things off the table the only thing left is varnish. >> charles, are we going off the cliff? >> look, it is almost impossible to predict. the republicans are in such disarray that they may take on december 30. if they don'
gersh with more on the critical work that has to get done in washington this weekend. >> reporter: the president declared himself modestly optimistic congress could still reach an agreement to head off huge tax hikes on january first, but he also warned lawmakers to get their work done. >> the american people are not going to have patience with a self-inflicted wound on the economy. >> reporter: senate republican leader mitch mcconnell called the white house meeting a good one and he told his fellow republicans he hoped to have a fiscal cliff recommendation soon. >> we will be working hard to see if we can get there in next 24 hours and so i am hopeful and optimistic. >> reporter: but the sticking point remains finding something that can make it through the house with enough support from republicans. >> it seems like the 250 threshold that the president proposed previously is unlikely to pass the house in its current form, and so without some sort of additional compromise there, it seems unlikely that we're going to get something done before the end of the year. >> susie: you know
and violence. in washington, the woman who will not be secretary of state. >> i withdrew my name because i think it's the right thing for the country, and i think it's the right thing for the president. gwen: how politics derailed u.n. ambassador susan rice, even as at least one critical foreign policy matter heats up, syria. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. gwen: on the domestic front, the slow march towards the fiscal cliff continues. >> i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage. >> it's clear the president is just not serious about cutting spending. >> covering the week, reid wilson of "the hotline," david sanger of "the new york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the
, and the s&p was off 3 points. so while wall street worked half a day, washington was on vacation. lawmakers are increasingly pessimistic about a big agreement-- or any agreement-- being reached before the year ends. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: 'twas the night before christmas, and all through the house, nothing much was going on. it was the same story in the senate. washington's cliff talks still remain deadlocked. congress will return on thursday, and it's still possible a few days of holiday cheer and constituent outrage may push republicans and democrats to craft a last-minute agreement to avoid the worst of the fiscal cliff. if we do go over the cliff, the i.r.s. has warned most taxpayers may not be able to file their returns until late march. that would mean long delays for many tax refunds. and economists warn the economic effects will be felt quickly if $600 billion in automatic tax increases and spending cuts begin to take effect next year. at this rate, it looks like lawmakers will celebrate new year's eve at work-- if not resolving the fiscal cliff, at least trying t
's the chief market analyst at john thomas financial. president obama is due back in washington tomorrow, cutting short his hawaiian holiday vacation. he will be meeting with congressional leaders for one last push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet called their members back to washington. and hopes for a deal by the december 31 deadline are fading. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the odds of avoiding the fiscal cliff did not get any better over the holiday. staff discussions continue, but there were few signs much, if anything has been accomplished. the house isn't even scheduled to return to washington yet, leaving it up to the senate to act. >> this is a senate that is incredibly divided, hopelessly partisan, requires 60 votes to do anything and somehow, we are going to be relying on them to in five days, come up with a compromise which is acceptable where a compromise wasn't acceptable in four years. >> reporter: it now looks like some kind of fall ov
washington. professor, good to have you back on this program. >> thank you for inviting me. tavis: i want to get into the book. let me start with the news of the day. everybody in washington is talking about the fiscal cliff. the so-called fiscal cliff. they're not talking to each other at the moment. that is what the conversation is going to get to, how do we avoid going over the so-called fiscal cliff? you suggested that the fiscal cliff might be good. i got a chance to go through your book. i understand, i think, why you might feel that way. the book argues that we need disorder to develop. we need disorder in our world to develop. we will come back to the book in a moment. based upon the motion -- that notion, why might the fiscal cliff be a good thing? >> we have been stuck for four years in a state of complacency. nobody wants to do anything about the accumulating problems. everybody knows about the problems. i think the civilization is masking deeper problems. if you let markets give you information, they will give the information. other than artificially prop up everything, like h
to the president about it. congresswoman kathy mcmorris rogers of washington state is the party's conference chair in the house. >> we're going to either succeed together or we're going to fail together. the president is calling for higher taxes as well as more spending. he's calling for another stimulus. at a time when we need tax reform. we need to be looking at... and the republicans have put forward tax reform that includes closing the loopholes, eliminating some of those tax credits, that will actually impact the wealthiest. >> reporter: some republicans said the boehner plan goes too far in taxing the well-off. south carolina senator jim demint, a staunch fiscal conservative, blasted the plan on twitter today. he said speaker boehner's offer of an $800 billion tax hike will destroy jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more. but the senate's democratic majority leader harry reid warned republicans against listening to such voices. >> you can't let these negotiations be dictated by the tea party. our guiding principle should be the views of the vast majority of the american p
, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics
in washington. after trading near breakeven for most of the day, the dow moved up in the last hour of trading to close up nearly 60 points. the nasdaq added six, the s&p up almost eight points. >> susie: on capitol hill tonight, lawmakers in the house of representatives are getting ready to vote on a fiscal cliff bill. house speaker john boehner calls it "plan b" and it is expected to be a close vote. the bill proposes to extend tax breaks for everyone making less than $1 million. the move comes as talks to avert the fiscal cliff hit an impasse. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: as washington looks over the edge of the fiscal cliff, democrats and republicans were throwing elbows and getting personal. speaker boehner explained why he pushed the house to vote on a republican plan "b" tonight. >> i did my part, they did nothing. and frankly, i'm convinced that the president is unwilling to stand up to his own party on the big issues that face our country. time is running short. the house will act today, and then it will be up to senate democrats and the president to act. >> reporter: the white
. >> reporter: the house will vote on the republican plan b tomorrow. veterans of washington's budget battles wouldn't be surprised to see a plan c or d before a final resolution is hammered out. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people ar
rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations continue. as we taped this program it is 5:30 p.m. the house of representatives is expected to vote on the republican plan b later it this evening. house majority leader eric cantor urged democrats to support the bill which extends the bush tax cuts on income over 1 million. >> we house republicans are taking concrete actions to avoid the fiscal cliff. absent a balanced offer from the president, this is our nation's best option. and senate democrats should take up both of these measures immediately. and the president has a decision to make. he can support these measures or be responsible for reckless spending and the largest tax hike in american history. >> rose: the white house has pledged to veto plan b as 2012 comes to a close it remains to be seen whether law lakers will rise above partisanship or avert fiscal crisis. joining me al hunt and july yana goldman. we want to talk about the fiscal cliff. we want to talk about white house appointments. we want to talk about gun control and we want to talk about hearings o
: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdr
. >> this week on "inside washington," let's make a deal. >> we are ready and eager to talk to the president and make sure that the american people are not disadvantaged by what is happening in washington. >>. or. >> an obsession to raise taxes is not going to solve the problem. >> a leading conservative decides to give up his senate seats. >> a lot of my role in the senate has been stopping bad things, but we need to do more than that and tell americans what we are for. >> in syria, a concern about the possible use of weapons of mass destruction if south. >> the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> the chattering classes are already chatting about 2016. >> look, i am flattered, i am honored. that is not in the future for may. "tim brant's college football captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> for the record, the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%, the economy adding 146,000 jobs in november. we want to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a de
in washington today, there was a major announcement regarding president obama's cabinet. massachusetts senator john kerry was nominated to be the next secretary of state. after confirmation, the former presidential candidate will succeed hillary clinton to serve as america's top diplomat. so what can we expect from him in that role? for answers, i spoke to the former u.s. state department spokesman. of course, americans united nations ambassador, susan rice, was the top favorite. how effective will john kerry be? >> he has great spirits. in a sense, the obama administration has used him very effectively in the past four years. he was first on the ground in copenhagen with the climate change negotiations. he was inserted into the troubled relationship the united states has with pakistan. he has had effective conversations with president karzai, and he did some yeoman's work when it came to negotiations with south sudan. he has made his mark already in terms of conflict reduction, crisis mitigation. i think he will carry that experience into his new position. >> nevertheless, some would say he h
up with. statements from the founding fathers about our guns. toward washington. -- george washington. try to stop gun sales in this country, you will run into a series of roadblocks. >> australia had a mass killing in the mid-1990s and they passed a severe loss where all existing guns had to be turned in. the government bought them back. after a certain date if they were in your home, you were arrested. they have had a decrease in crime and suicide, which is an interesting development. it seems to me, you either have to go that route, which you cannot in the u.s. -- gun ownership in australia was 5% of households. gallup has shown is 47% here. we have the second amendment and the history back to washington. given that we are a different culture, the kinds of laws that we pass are almost always an effective as a result, because there are 300 million weapons out there today. unless you recall them the way that australia did, and we cannot do that -- you would have a reservoir that would last 100 years. >> you can imagine what would happen. there would be an insurrection. >> you do not
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republica
will resign in january. to become the next president of the heritage foundation-- a conservative washington think tank. in a statement, demint said, a tea party favorite, demint had blasted the house republicans' proposal to raise revenue earlier in the week. south carolina's other senator lindsey graham lamented the loss of his colleague and friend. >> he really did strongly and passionately advocate for his position and did it very effectively, jim made the republican party quite frankly look inward and do some self evaluation, conservatism is an asset not a liability. >> woodruff: the other side of capitol hill was largely quiet today, with the house not in session, and most members gone home for the weekend's recess. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": egypt's political turmoil; trims to social programs to solve the fiscal crisis; sea level rise in a virginia city; diplomatic movement on syria and a path to high school graduation. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the death toll from a typhoon in the southern philippines climbed to mor
. >> thank you. >> you've no doubt been following the maneuvers in washington over the country's finances. well, they're heading now toward a showdown. unless someone blinks, the collision of irresistible forces with immovable objects will be felt around the world. president obama says he won't budge when it comes to ending the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. and as rumors mount that some republicans may be willing to give ground on taxes, conservatives in the party are shouting, "remember the alamo!" and demanding their leaders in congress yield not an inch. dozens of conservative activists, outraged at the prospect of compromise, have sent an open letter to republicans in the house and senate "to stand firm and not surrender your conservative principles." their hero, of course, is this man, known around town simply as grover. no, not the muppet, but chief enforcer of the notorious norquist pledge against taxes. republican candidates for office must sign or risk defeat by right-wing candidates in primaries where a turnout of die-hard partisans can decide the outcome. among republican poli
charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opposition in republican ranks, he pulled it, and sent the house home for the holiday. reid charged today politics explained why the speaker had not yet called the house back. >> john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on a firm financial footing. it's obvious what's going on. he's waiting until january 3 to get reelected to speaker before he gets serious about negotiatio
there for long. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: the fiscal cliff was certainly one topic on the agenda of the federal reserve today as policymakers kicked off their two-day meeting. tomorrow, the world will be waiting to see whether the central bank will do more to prop up the u.s. economy. the big question is whether the fed will stick with its so- called "operation twist" bond- buying program, or will it announce something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that doesn't necessarily mean the stock market will shout. at it's final meeting of the year, the central bank is not expected to simply extend its operation twist program. that's the nickname for the fed's strategy of buying long- term treasuries and, at the same time, selling an equal amount of shorter-dated bonds. that's important because it keeps the bank's balance sheet the same size. now, the fed may be ready to do a new stimulus dance. >> under twist, they've been purchasing $45 billion longer term treasuries while at the same
control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of the rebels winning the civil war in syria. the assad regime was losing control of more and more territory, an opposition victory could not be ruled out. it is unclear whether this means there will be a u-turn in
in chicago and washington d.c. are unconstitutional. the most likely move would be to ban military-style assault rifles, magazines holding numerous bullet. the president has backed such a bill. >> while he supports strongly an assault weapons ban and other measures, he wants to expand the conversation beyond those specific areas of legislation. >> i'm joe manchin -- >> the group of the gun hand -- of the gun ban will be loosened a little. even west virginia senator joe manchin, whose campaign had focused on gun rights, has changed his mind. he is not alone kerpen >> when my daughters ask me on friday night, dad, you are in the senate, why can't we put reasonable restrictions on assault weapons or rapid-fire ammunition clips, i did not have a good answer for them. enough is enough. >> america is in a reflective mood, which may not last. weapons of war should not be available to take the lives of children. >> the white house came out today with steps they would take toward tougher gun control. the national rifle association has released a statement saying they are prepared to offer m
of tax increases and spending cuts has been the ultimate political football in washington. there is little sign of any holiday good cheer. >> in washington, the fiscal cliff a stalemate remains. >> the latest on the fiscal cliff. >> the ugly phrase that is on everyone's lips, fiscal cliff, is what america could tumble off and 11 days. it means that if the president and congress cannot agree on a plan to sort out finances, there will be automatic savage cuts and brittle tax rises. neither side is budging much. >> it is very hard for them to say yes to me. at some point, they have got to take me out of it and think about their voters. >> four weeks, the white house said that if i move on rates, they would make substantial concessions on spending cuts and entitlement reform. i did my part. they have done nothing. >> it would mean automatic spending cuts worth more than a trillion dollars. taxes for the average household would go up by about three and a half thousand dollars. most economists say the u.s. would be put back into recession and global growth could be halved. the u
increases and spending cuts. no statement is expected anytime soon. we go live now to washington to war correspondent, ben. >> all of the participants at this meeting left without a word. i don't think we will hear from them the rest of the day. there is a great deal at stake and very little time left. it has been reported that president obama presented a plan to increase taxes on income over a quarter million dollars per year, as part of the deficit reduction plan to deal with american debt. he would probably say to the congressional leaders that need to figure out a way to get it through, but i think the expectations in washington of a deal are low with only three, four days left until the new year and the media tax hikes and spending cuts taking and -- kicking in. >> that means perhaps heading back into recession? >> yes, there is little doubt in washington about the seriousness of the sick jubilation. the problem is withdrawing government demand from the economy too big spending programs, cuts with a smothering effect on the tax hikes will have been very damaging effect on the was e
solman begins our coverage. >> reporter: washington brightened yesterday when the annual switch was flipped; the white house christmas tree, relit. and this morning, more holiday cheer, it seemed, in the form of the monthly jobs numbers. 146,000 new jobs were created last month, according to the survey of employers; unemployment dropped again, to 7.7%, according to the survey of households. both numbers better than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufactu
the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is an inappropriate metaphor. and it does conjure u
in washington the debate is returning to the always thorny issue of gun control. members of congress are starting to be heard on gun law, heeding the president's call to act to prevent another atrocity. as he had on friday, the president pressed for change last night regardless he said of the politics. >> in the coming weeks i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. >> suarez: today at the capitol, there were early signs of a possible break in the long dead lock on gun control. on ms-nbc west virginia senator joe said newtown has changed the conversation. >> i ask all my friends in the n.r.a. -- and i'm a proud n.r.a. member and always have been -- that we need to sit down and move this dialogue a sensible, reasonable approach to fixing it. it's part of it, not all of it. everything has to be on the table and i think it will be >> suarez: this afternoon the senate opened with a moment of silence for the newtown victims. t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)